JumpOnIt.com nails Australian Facebook campaign

JumpOnIt, an online startup, has successfully used Facebook to launch itself to the Australian market with an established fan base of more than 400,000 consumers.

JumponitThe leading Australian social commerce website has successfully attracted tens of thousands of members since May this year, thanks to the power of social networks. The site works by bringing consumers discounts of up to 90 percent on city activities and experiences such as dining, spas, health clubs and more. The offer runs as a deal of the day where consumers have only 24 hours to secure the discount. Buyers purchase coupons individually and once a minimum number of people “jump on it” the deal is activated and consumers are instantly emailed their coupon.

The JumpOnIt.com executive team has extensive experience in the online sphere. CEO Colin Fabig is a serial Internet entrepreneur with nearly two decades experience in technology and communications. He is joined by James Gilbert (ex-Genis) and ex-Infochoice and founder of Harrow Media Adam Rigby (COO). The team launched their site backed by $1.3 million in funding from a consortium of private investors including Roger Allen (Chairman of Allen & Buckeridge) and Nextec Capital.

Fabig says developing a “tribe” to market to prior to launching was a key part of the executive team’s business strategy. The “I Love” city-based Facebook fan pages for Sydney, Melbourne , Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth, were set up to generate a community buzz, communicate with clients, drive sales and grow the JumpOnIt.com site. The pages have been so popular they are now Australia’s fastest-growing Facebook pages, with membership now at 415,000 fans – fast eclipsing popular pages such as MasterChef with its 169,000 fans.

Fabig says the pages have become a popular community forum that attracts up to 2,000 comments per day. The Sydney fan page has grown by 100 percent while the Melbourne fan page has grown 80 percent in just over two months. The rapid growth of these pages can be put down to their combination of targeted deals and giveaways for fans. Fans are able to spread the news of deals to their social networks while businesses gain the rare chance to connect with consumers – a win for both parties.

“We continually ask fans to tell us what they want more of, and we deliver on that. Our posts attract hundreds of positive responses and new fans each day,” he says.

JumpOnIt.com employs a full-time staff member to manage social networks; ensuring pages are frequently updated with content ranging from the latest deals to coveted events and experiences in each city. This has enabled the site creators to successfully engage notoriously fickle Internet users and grow their pages. Third-party businesses are signing up in droves, lured by the rare opportunity to be in front of a large, almost guaranteed, sales channel. “For local businesses, the concept is a no-brainer. They offer their service at a great discount to our captive Jump On It member base at no cost or upfront risk to them and we guarantee to deliver hundreds, if not thousands of new customers without an extra dollar spent on advertising.”

Brands that have already jumped on board this marketing opportunity include the Sheraton, The Observatory Hotel and Guzman y Gomez. A vast array of award winning restaurants, tourist attractions, spas, experiences and activities have also been signed up.

However Fabig cautions that using social media as a marketing tool is not for every business. “Social media works for us because we are an online business with a targeted market. But businesses need to understand that social networking sites cannot always be controlled. You need to really understand your audience and how to cater to their interests. No matter how passionate your customer is, no one wants to have constant updates about your product alone. The JumpOnIt.com model works because we have two streams of content: our great daily deals and a city community buzz that is impossible to manufacture.”

Jumponit's I love Sydney page